Welcoming a New Era – The Technological Age!

Living in the technological age is one of the greatest advantages of our generation. We have connected to other nations like we never did before. Globalization is in reach, and technology’s advancement has just started. We can now communicate to other people across distances. Ideas are being tossed around and new ones pop up like mushrooms. This can also be named as the great age of innovation and invention, as we tend to develop the things that we have only thought of decades before. The internet has helped to make all of this possible, and everything is still in the process of improving.

In the business world, tech giants rule the game. Comparing them to other industries, they are very young. Some of them even just started to develop at the end of 20th century. As the industry grows and advances, the need for tech items and products is also increasing. We bear witness to the phenomenon today: new models of phones come out almost every year and it just keeps getting better and better.

You might be wondering how much do these companies even make during this time. Sites like Loanable offer infographics to help you see their revenues in real time! Companies like Apple and Google are here, as well as others like Facebook, Netflix and other social media apps.

Welcoming a New Era – The Technological Age!
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Do Startups Really Change The World?

Do Startups Really Change The World?

Firstly, my hypothesis is that the startup culture will have a major positive impact on the poorest communities in the world. Or put another way, I believe the culture can spread wealth far more evenly than ever before. However, the devil is in the detail and it would be useful to debate some current assumptions. So:

Are startups good? – Tech startups currently rule the world. Millenniums and many others no longer dream of a corporate career. Many want to take their lives into their own hands and aspire to change the world. It is widely recognised that corporations find it hard to innovate and much of the action is taking place in much more agile startup teams. However, with power comes responsibility and many startups sail close to the line of social acceptability.

The so-called ‘Sharing Economy’ is a point in case. Startups such as Uber and Airbnb have ruthlessly pursued market share in winner-takes-all industry sectors. Not much sharing there then. There is a conflict between the need of these startups to grow and the messaging to their consumer base that is much more idealistic in their objectives. Is it unhealthy that these companies are able to build such large war-chests to fight off challenges by others? Don’t these startups need to grow responsibly or risk losing the support of their own users?

I feel overwhelmingly positive about startup culture. However, it is not a license to act irresponsibly or a backdoor to outright capitalism without any checks and balances. If founders (and investors) do not recognise this, they will undermine the whole startup movement.

Is the Silicon Valley model good? – Silicon Valley is the engine driving the startup economy. Not only has a huge proportion of startup economic growth come out of Silicon Valley but many of the technologies and processes have been developed there, from the gig economy to ubiquitous data visualisation of everything, now even to be found in such dedicated MS programs such as Power BI. There is little doubt that the guiding principles of The Valley are positive. Success has been underpinned by principle that founders are given access to a pool of awesome talent, knowledgeable support and almost unlimited capital.

However, The Silicon Valley model has resulted in group-think that ignores the huge limitations in the model for the rest of the world. The idea that resources have to be concentrated in clusters has a negative economic impact on much of society and is illogical in the age of the internet. Is it now possible for a bright entrepreneur in Lagos, armed with a copy of The Lean Startup to access many of the resources he needs to build a great business?

I would argue that internet-based platforms will change the world of entrepreneurship (slightly biased as I run such a platform), in just the same way as they are changing so many other sectors.  The objective has to be to provide great founders, wherever they are, with the capital …

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Jason Kulpa, San Diego Serial Entrepreneur, Shares the Four Types of Managers–and the One that Best Improves Worker Performance

Jason Kulpa, San Diego Serial Entrepreneur, Shares the Four Types of Managers--and the One that Best Improves Worker Performance

Only 40 percent of workers deem their managers to be helpful in their attainment of skills necessary for performing well in their current job function, according to a study by Gartner Inc. Fewer workers also say that their manager is effective at getting them ready to pursue their future career. All in all, vast swaths of workers feel their managers don’t provide the help they need to advance in their current career path and develop prospects for the future.

There are also those who attribute their excellent work performance and career growth to their managers. Those are the managers, much like Jason Kulpa the CEO of UE.co, that greatly benefit any business organization. Gartner researchers identified four types of managers–teacher, always-on, cheerleader, and connector managers.

  • Connector managers, who develop top performers in their teams effectively, frequently make sound assessments of their employees’ skills, do targeted coaching, and give feedback only within their specific areas of expertise.
  • Teacher managers train workers according to their expertise and experience; they tend to oversee the development of employees and give advice-type responses personally.
  • Always-on managers frequently coach their employees and offer feedback spanning different skills and disciplines; when always-on managers assist in upgrading their subordinates’ skills, they do so with the mindset that it is a part of their managerial duty. The study showed they lowered worker performance by up to 8 percent because they gave too much feedback, much of which was irrelevant or misguided.
  • Cheerleader managers, often characterized by their non-proactive hands-off approach to improving employee performance, give positive comments, remain supportive and approachable, and pretty much let their workers be responsible for themselves.

The connector manager consistently produces top performers among their subordinates with their distinctive approach to supervising people. The rest connect their employees to get feedback from in-house experts. In a nutshell, tailored and strategic coaching is the most effective way to drive employee performance.

 About Jason Kulpa:

Jason Kulpa is the founder and CEO of UE.co, an Inc. Fastest Growing Company that delivers cutting-edge marketing products and services. After graduating from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State, Mr. Kulpa made a career from encouraging growth in several exciting areas of the tech industry. He is San Diego Business Journal’s “Most Admired CEO” for 2018.

 

Jason Kulpa Around the Web:

http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3862998

http://www.nbcrightnow.com/story/39026829/ueco-ceo-jason-kulpa-announces-entrepreneur-scholarship-winner

https://angel.co/jasonkulpa

https://forbescouncils.com/members/agency/profile/Jason-Kulpa-CEO-Founder-UE-co-UE-co/45315543-918e-4070-a59b-be44bfa066bd

https://www.crunchbase.com/person/jason-kulpa

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Robb Misso, Successful CEO, Describes 3 Steps to Employee Buy-in and How to Guide Your Team Through Change

Robb Misso, Successful CEO, Describes 3 Steps to Employee Buy-in and How to Guide Your Team Through Change

Periods of crisis and change are the most stressful and challenging time for teams and their leaders. But you can make it through with productivity and morale intact if you are strong for your team with the right leadership attitude. By encouraging your team to think of change as an opportunity, you can quickly move your team from resistance with a past focus to commitment with a future focus.

“Everything that exists is already fraying at the edges and is in transition.”

–Marcus Aurelius, second century Roman emperor.

 

Moving Through Change from Past to Future Focused

Getting your team through change means leading them through a change curve: through denial, resistance, acceptance and finally to commitment. Adapted by Sue Stockdale from the five stages of grief, this four-step process starts with employees focused on the past of what was. But as employees learn what’s happening, they will move through the present and finally look forward toward the future of what can be.

The transition from resistance to acceptance of change is the hardest part to get through. But with enough information and time, you can get your team to see the present as it really is. As they go from resistance to acceptance, they will see the reality of the present in a sudden moment of clarity, almost like the eureka moment of creativity.

To bring your team through the past, present and future, follow these three steps advised by Robb Misso, co-founder of DMS and Austin Regional Manufacturer’s Association (ARMA).

1. Understand the Change

Whether the change is expected or unexpected, the first step is to understand what is happening. Before you go to your team, ask yourself about how your own experience with change prepares you for what’s happening, and use strategic assessment tools such as SWOT to assess the situation. By following SWOT analysis, you’ll have a clear understanding of how to counter employee objections of weaknesses and threats with the potential opportunities and strengths of change.

To help in this process, treat change as an opportunity in your own leadership style, even during stable periods. People react to events based on attitudes built up over time. Instill an attitude of opportunity in your team by always being open to questions and suggestions, but don’t make promises you can’t deliver on.

2. Understand Resistance

Once you’re clear on how the team and the business are changing, step into your employees’ shoes and try to think about how they will react. What are their personalities like? Are they generally open to new ideas, or is it going to take some time to bring them past denial and resistance?

After planning for how your team will react, go to your team and drive home what is happening. Be realistic and direct. Don’t pretend that things might be able to stay the same if they can’t. Don’t try to fight legitimate fears by lying. Getting resistance is better than letting your team sleep in a dreamland …

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Energy Venture Scanner Insights venture debt funds in india

Energy Venture Scanner Insights venture debt funds in india

investors network south africaAbout: Munich-primarily based Siemens Venture Capital (SVC), the central venture capital organization inside Siemens, invests in early-stage technology firms and established development firms, focusing on the energy, business and healthcare sectors. Avesthagen had recently raised $32 mn from Fidelity Investments and France-based biotech majors BioMerieux and Limagrain and the meals giant Danone. The organization has also raised $five-7 mn from Indian corporates such as the Godrej, Cipla, the Tata Group, and ICICI Ventures. ICICI Ventures and Fidelity hold 19% and ten% stake, respectively, in the firm although other strategic investors hold 4-6% stake.

Dubai-primarily based fund-of-funds Evolvence Capital is launching an AIM-listed closed-ended FOF in January which will invest in Indian PE funds. The fund intends to raise $105 mn for the Evolvence India Fund. The FOF will invest in a number of closed-ended PE funds focused on the Indian infrastructure, pharmaceutical and retail sectors. UTI Ventures’ Ascent India Fund, Barings India Private Equity Fund II, IDFC Private Equity Fund II, India Value Fund II, IL&FS’ Leveraged India Fund and New York Life Investment Management India Fund II will be the initial beneficiaries of the fund.

About: 3i Group plc is a London-primarily based mid-industry private equity company. The Company focuses on buyouts, growth capital and infrastructure. It invests across Europe, Asia and North America. The Firm, together with its subsidiaries, manages a quantity of funds established with institutions and other investors to make equity and equity-associated investments predominantly in un-quoted businesses in Europe and Asia. It also advises 3i Infrastructure plc, an investment business, which invests in infrastructure assets. The Organization invests in sectors, such as business solutions, consumer economic services, common industrial, healthcare, media, oil, gas and energy, technology and infrastructure. 3i Investments plc acts as an investment manager to the Organization. In April 2009, the Business sold off its remaining stake of about four% in ProStrakan Group Plc.

The New England Venture investment

investors network on climate riskAbout: Munich-based Siemens Venture Capital (SVC), the central venture capital organization within Siemens, invests in early-stage technologies companies and established development businesses, focusing on the power, business and healthcare sectors. The 2009 San Francisco conference dubbed OneMedForum () provided a refreshing break from the same-old, exact same-old crunch of the bigger investor conference down the street. OneMedPlace featured a series of forums focusing on challenges and possibilities in todays healthcare markets. Panelists integrated captains of the medtech business, VC superstars and a smattering of service providers such as attorneys and I-bankers. With no exception, the forums were nicely attended and topical, covering subjects like financing in these bleak occasions, evolving reimbursement scenarios and technology developments in the numerous medical specialties. A second track spotlighted executives of small public and private firms giving their pitch to a an audience of investors that was very easily double that of final year’s event.

IIFC’s paid-up capital is Rs. one hundred crores. It sanctions loans up to 20% of the project expense. Out of the 46 projects which are under the IIFC’s consideration, 31 …

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